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R-MC to Host British Debaters on October 19

Oct 05, 2017

10/10/17

Caroline Kouneski, Ted Sheckels, Sean GordonThe Randolph-Macon College Franklin Debating Society will host the touring British debaters on October 19, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in the Washington Room, Washington-Franklin Hall (104 College Avenue). This event is free and open to the public. Map and Directions

Caroline Kouneski '19 (political science major; communication studies and religious studies minor) and Sean Gordon '19 (political science major; ethics minor) will represent Randolph-Macon College. The topic of the debate is "Resolved: this House would ban private political donations."

English and Communication Studies Professor Ted Sheckels, who coaches the Franklin Debating Society, says, "We're hoping many students, faculty and staff attend. The debate is always lively, entertaining, and thought-provoking, and audience members are encouraged to participate."

Communication Studies Professor Ruth Beerman serves as assistant debate and forensics coach.

Beerman says, "I'm excited for the debate, as the R-MC community can see argument and debate in action. Additionally, I'm pairing the Thursday night debate with my class; the British team will talk to students in my fall 2017 Argumentation course about competitive debate, argument, and advocacy."

This year's British team consists of Richard Hunter, a modern history graduate from St. Andrew's University in Scotland; and Rebecca Howard, an economics and German graduate from the University of Birmingham. They have both award-winning debating careers and extensive experience judging debate internationally.

The Franklin Debating Society
Fostering the invaluable skills of public speaking and reasoned discourse, the Franklin Debating Society also gives students the opportunity to participate in lively debate competitions. Franklin Debating Society members compete intercollegiately in debate and a range of forensics activities. The Society annually hosts the touring British debaters as well as a 19th Century-style debating event.